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UNIT 1 CHAPTER ON PDF


A. Unit 1 Notebook order list
1. Vocabulary terms
2. Reading Guide
3. Handouts/Activities –1)cookie map, 2)Maps/Map projections chart, 3)Diffusion/Cholera activity,





B. Nature/Perspectives vocabulary - Copies are also provided in class.
Good site for getting started: Quizlet for APHG > https://quizlet.com/subject/human-geography-ap-hug/




C. N/P chapter 1 reading guide

D. RESOURCES/HANDOUTS

Unit Assessment - 2 pages (State of Confusion map and questions)


World Perceptions map activity and directions > Map was provided in class. You will need the activity sheet/directions if you finish the map for homework.

REGIONS MAP - From the oultline > Identification of major world regions
World regions maps: Many of these regions overlap or have transitional boundaries, such as Brazil, which is part of Latin America but has Portuguese colonial heritage. Although some regions are based on culture, others are defined by physiographic features, such as sub-Saharan Africa, which is the part of the continent south of the Sahara Desert. Not all geographers agree on how each region is defined. One geographer may place Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Middle East, but another may place them in Central Asia as both countries were formerly parts of the Soviet Union . Likewise some geographers use the term Middle East, whereas others use Southwest Asia to describe the same region.

This map goes in your toolkit >



COOKIE MAP ACTIVITY


5 THEMES OF GEOGRAPHY FOR COOKIE MAP >


AP VERBS



WHY GEOGRAPHY MATTERS rdg 1213 and Geography painting (ppt)

E. N/P outline notes 1617 (very basic)




F. N/P unit review - Print this review sheet and put it at the end of your unit.



An older version


GIS video link from class > http://geospatialrevolution.psu.edu/episode1/chapter1
42 Amazing maps video > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dldHalRY-hY
Basic map terminology video (Set to Star Wars music so it is awesome....) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TyaMZJ0WdHM&feature=related
Cool map resources

10 big ideas in geography
1. location - where is it?
2. distance - how far is it? proximity 3. region - common ground
4. movement - where to next?
5. scale - how big is it?
6. spatial diffusion - how does it spread/move?
7. spatial distribution - how is it arranged?
8. spatial association - what goes with what, this goes with that, patterns
9. spatial interaction - how strongly is it related?
10. spatial change over time - before and after


G. APHG OUTLINE
Content from the AP Human Geography Course Description-
*For Unit I, much of the content is embedded throughout the course and not just during the Unit I schedule.
I. Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives

Enduring Understandings (Students will understand …)
Learning Objectives (Students will be able to …)
Essential Knowledge (Students will know that …)
A
Geography, as a field of inquiry, looks at the world from a spatial perspective.
Explain the importance of geography as a field of study.
Geographic information provides context for understanding spatial relationships and human– environment interaction.
B
Geography offers a set of concepts, skills, and tools that facilitate critical thinking and problem solving.
Explain major geographical concepts underlying the geographic perspective.
Geographical concepts include location, place, scale, space, pattern, nature and society, networks, flows, regionalization, and globalization.

Use landscape analysis to examine the human organization of space.

Landscape analysis (e.g., field observations, photographic interpretations) provides a context for understanding the location of people, places, regions, and events; human–environment relationships; and interconnections between and among places and regions.
C
Geographical skills provide a foundation for analyzing world patterns and processes.
Use spatial thinking to analyze the human organization of space.
People apply spatial concepts to interpret and understand population and migration; cultural patterns and processes; political organization of space;agriculture, food production, and rural land use; industrialization and economic development; and cities and urban land use.

Use and interpret maps.

Maps are used to represent and identify spatial patterns and processes at different scales.

Types of maps include reference maps (e.g., physical and political maps) and thematic maps (e.g., choropleth, dot, graduated symbol, isoline, cartogram).


All map projections (e.g., Mercator, polar) inevitably distort spatial relationships (e.g., shape, area, distance, direction).

Apply mathematical formulas and graphs to interpret geographic concepts.
Mathematical formulas and graphs are used to analyze rates of natural increase in population, population doubling time, rank-size rule for cities, and distance-decay functions.
Use and interpret geographic models.
Geographers use models as generalizations to think systematically about topics such as land use (e.g., vonThünen model, Latin American city model), industrial location (e.g., Weber model), and the distribution of settlements (e.g., Christaller’s central place theory).
C
Geographical skills provide a foundation for analyzing world patterns and processes.

Use concepts such as space, place, and region to examine geographic issues.

Geographical issues include problems related to human– environmental interactions (e.g., sustainable agriculture); conflict and cooperation among countries (e.g., European Union); and planning and public-policy decision making (e.g., pronatalist policies).

Interpret patterns and processes at different scales.

Patterns and processes at different scales reveal variations in and different interpretations of data (e.g., age–sex pyramids, population density).

Define region as a concept, identify world regions, and understand regionalization processes.

Regions are defined on the basis of one or more unifying characteristics (e.g., corn belt) or on patterns of activity (e.g., hinterlands of ports).
Types of regions include formal, functional, and perceptual.

World regions are defined for this course by the maps in the course curriculum section of the AP Human Geography Course Description.


World regions may overlap (e.g., Southeast Asia and Asia) and often have transitional boundaries (e.g., North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa).

Explain and evaluate the regionalization process.
Regional thinking is applied at local, national, and global scales.
Regionalism refers to a group’s perceived identification with a particular region at any scale (e.g., Quebec).
Analyze changing interconnections among places.
Interconnections among places include exchanges of natural resources, agricultural commodities, finished products, services, people, information, money, and pollutants.
D
Geospatial technologies increase the capability for gathering and analyzing geographic information with applications to everyday life.

Use and interpret geospatial data.

Geospatial technologies include geographic information systems (GIS), satellite navigation systems (e.g., global positioning system), remote sensing, and online mapping and visualization.
Geospatial data (e.g., census data, satellite imagery) is used at all scales for personal (e.g., navigation), business (e.g., marketing), and governmental (e.g., environmental planning) purposes.
E
Field experiences continue to be important means of gathering geographic information and data.
Use quantitative and qualitative geographic data.
Data may be gathered in the field by organizations (e.g., census data) or by individuals (e.g., interviews, surveys, photography, informal observations).
Quantitative and qualitative geographic data are used in economic, environmental, political, and social decision making.
F . Identification of major world regions
World regions maps: Many of these regions overlap or have transitional boundaries, such as Brazil, which is part of Latin America but has Portuguese colonial heritage. Although some regions are based on culture, others are defined by physiographic features, such as sub-Saharan Africa, which is the part of the continent south of the Sahara Desert. Not all geographers agree on how each region is defined. One geographer may place Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Middle East, but another may place them in Central Asia as both countries were formerly parts of the Soviet Union . Likewise some geographers use the term Middle East, whereas others use Southwest Asia to describe the same region